The Anime Nostalgia Facility.

Carlo Anime Kyo Club Video 1993Join me on my Nostalgic journey of the Anime Fandom in the UK from mid 1980's to the late 1990's, in celebration of the pioneers.

After years of hoarding boxes of Anime magazines, Japanese comic books, Anime convention ephemera, personal correspondence, VHS Video tapes, fanzines, and Anime Club details.
I would like to add to the World Wide Web's records this account of a time before e-mails and websites were popular, and how a Fandom grew.

[My intention is to get across the accurate facts of how different 80's & 90;s Fandom is to the ultra modern Internet generation, that have it all that their fingertips, what takes seconds, minutes, and a few hours, took days, weeks and years for the postal generation!]

I would like to dedicate this Blog to two pioneers that heavily influenced my fascination with Japanese popular culture – Toren Smith (April 12, 1960 to March 4, 2013) and Carl Macek (September 21, 1951 to April 17, 2010). Your choices shaped a whole generation, even outside of the US in falling in love with the pictorial image and animated visuals from Japan.

[The start of the UK Anime Fandom was a collection of Pen-Pals – That's right people wrote letters to each other on paper and sent them in envelopes via the post, and it took days to get to the other person and you had to wait days or weeks for a reply (as long as you included a SSAE). There was NO Instant Messaging, or texting and e-mail was practically unheard of.] 

Anime Kyo UK 1991 -1997
Two entries can be found; One for the Fan Club 'ANIME KYO UK' and one for its Publication 'A.K.N.' (Anime Kyo News) @ fandata.com

[NOTES: For 1980's and 1990's early Anime fandom, that was from a paper-age before the popularity of the World Wide Web (Internet), The Fandom Directory helped so many find like-minded enthusiasts!]

2016 Marks 25 years of supporting Anime Conventions in the uk.
Well done Sheffield Space Centre.

Anime Day 1991
Ads from 1991 and 1992


  1. I've done the RSS thing to this, and no I haven't forgotten about the photographs I've promised you.

  2. Looking good, cant wait to see this site develop.

  3. Ah, the good old days of 5th gen very copies with Chinese subtitles. Looking forward to seeing this develop.

    1. Hello Tsunami,

      Thank you all for taking the time to post your thoughts about my personal trip down memory lane, a mostly forgotten time of exploration and discovery,

      I hope the blog has been a bit of nostalgia for you, thinkingof those snowy recordings of the good old days!

      It was way back in 2007 when I first thought that someone should chronicle those early days of the late 80's and early 90's UK Anime & Manga Fandom. After a year or two of procrastination, ok, ok, it was 2013 when I settled on a Blog instead of a website, it was high time that I organise my collection of fan letters and correspondence from Anime Pen-Pals, those early translated Manga that I still had, and boxes of all the paperwork that UK and US Anime distributors had sent me, and what paperwork I still had from the days that I ran my Fan club 'Anime Kyo UK'.

      Even after these 18 months or so of cataloguing and blogging I estimate that it will take 4 years to post what I have, so please drop in from time to time to my little museum of the time the Anime Fandom forgot.

      If you all could spread the word or offer encouragement, to keep me going that would make my day.

  4. Dredging my memory banks, I recall watching really bad (video) quality anime on third or fourth gen tapes with subtitles in Cantonese. Sometimes if you were lucky, the tapes would come with translation sheets, just A4 sheets of paper with the translations on, and you had to try and read along with the video.
    As for convention memories, they were always fun times, the cons were more relaxed and friendly than the more modern cons (the possible exception being Minamicon which has stayed true to it’s roots). Time was often spent sitting in the hotel foyer, chatting with people. These days the hotel foyer is a great place to see cosplayers.
    There was the time that Sheffield space centre forgot that the dealer's room opened early and I was left holding the fort for at least half an hour, looking after their stall.
    Then there was the all nighter at one of the Sheffield cons where they showed live action Kekko Kammen. No subs, so we made our own lines up. Near facial paralysis from laughing too much followed.
    There was the con where fandom struck back, the last of the Shinnenkai cons. From my point of view, as a gopher, things were not going well. Half the time we couldn't find con committee members when they were needed. Turns out, several of them had gone into central London to go shopping with the GOH (Chisa Yokoyama, seiyū for Sasami in Tenchi Muyo). The queue for the concert was immense as no-one thought that every single person at the con would want to go to it! Once the concert got started, we were prevented from taking photos of the star and it ended after three or four songs. When it came to the gophers party at the end of the convention, it simply never happened. The next year's con never took place as virtually no-one booked for it.
    Unfortunately, I wasn't able to go to the first Minamicon (I was at the other end of the country and had no idea it existed). I did go to the 2nd one, it was blisteringly hot (the last time Minami was held during the summer) and the hotel air con broke down. I remember ordering pizza from the hotel and not being able to face eating it, it was just too hot!
    There was a huge sense of camaraderie in the fandom in those days, the feeling that we were exploring something new and very different.

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    1. I too will echo that "There was a huge sense of camaraderie in the fandom in those days,"

  6. Great work. Keep up the posts.